construction

Mechanical & Engineering Photography.

Construction Industry Photographers.

Construction electrical engineering.

Find a very small space, fill with pipes heat exchangers, valves & pumps add an engineer, client, lighting equipment..and a photographer, then photograph.

Shooting M&E can be a challenge, photography in very small spaces is not just trying to ‘get everything in’ but to show an image that has clarity and some sense of depth.

Photographing the services that keep buildings working is either done during construction phase or as part of a re-fit or upgrade, either way job one on the list when getting to a location is the ‘tidy up’. I will often ask for the location to be tidied last thing day before the shoot..it gives the airborne dust time to settle and clear, brushing the floors when you are setting for the shoot just fills the air making for less contrast in the image..fills the camera and lenses..and me.

Getting a viewpoint can be a challenge, often there will be only one view that works or is the only place you can set the camera. Then adding lighting, using a technique of mixing both flash and light painting illumination can be used to highlight and add contrast and separation to each of the elements in the photograph.

Lens selection is also a consideration, not just a case of picking the widest shortest focal length but considering how the perspective can be made less extreme by image stiching with a slightly longer focal length lens.

Panic and planning. (adding a small detail can make a big difference) Construction Photography.

'F8 and be there' Creating construction photography images when you have no control.

Offshore Wind Construction Photography.

Offshore Wind Construction Photography.

Sometimes you get lucky..being a professional is about getting lucky every time you pitch up at a location, and being lucky is more about thinking ahead far enough to bring together elements in a changing environment.

Offshore Wind Construction Photographers

Offshore Wind Construction Photographers

Construction progress photography-returning to the same location over a period of time to record how a project is progressing. Progress photography used to be just another line on the project tender by the client so they have a record at regular intervals, it can be so much more.

Creating image content on projects can be a great tool to engage (read-customers/stakeholders) and often show to a wider audience the activities not often considered associated with a brand. 

Returning a location regularly can present opportunities and challenges to keep creating fresh new content to show the story unfolding. Often the first 'big' lift is all about innovation, proof of concept...and the engineer's calculations were correct! then stages of progress showing the race to completion.

Planned lifts often give you a little time to 'scope' out a few good viewpoints to get clear unobstructed views whilst working around exclusion zones and other activities, but sometimes as the process is happening and the 'elements' are moving around a potential shot lines itself up.

Working out if you you have time get off site-into the project offices-up the stairs-find a 'body'-persuade them to stop what they are doing-get their PPE on and go stand on a staircase for 15 mins..then get back to the camera without missing a key part of the lift..and whether it's worth it! All I will say as an industrial photographer fitness plays an important part (note to self: STAY AWAY FROM THE DESSERTS and cycle more!!) 

''F8 and be there” is attributed to the photographer Weegee (actually Arthur Fellig) who shot iconic street images during the 1930's and 40's, progress photography is similar..it's about being there-and being there often means you get to be in the right place at the right time.

The positioning of the 'branded' observer in the shot was something I had in mind for while but was waiting for the right alignment of elements. On big projects it's nice link the people and brand with the huge structure constructions-giving them 'ownership' of the project.

 

      

 

Construction Progress Photography

Construction Progress Photography

progress photography construction

Industrial Photographer.

It's cold and the days are short..it's all good news for photographers.

Cold often means clearing skies and short days gets us those 'night' shots of buildings and structures whilst everyone is still at work, so the lights are on inside buildings and there is still plenty of activity out on site.

Images shot at dusk can add an extra dimension to 'progress photography'-often as a contractual element included in the construction procurement process, progress photography is often seen as just a visual record of the construction phase. But think of it as a potential resource for marketing/reporting collateral the photography can really add visual captivation or message about your business. 

Construction and development sites can be pretty dynamic places for location photography anywhere in the world..warm or cold.

construction photography

 

  

Construction Photographer. UK CSCS Card.

Construction Phase Photographer with CSCS Card.

In the organised chaos of a busy construction site getting photographers with CSCS cards to make visual sense can be a challenge.

If you look there can be beautiful order to the composition of building sites and architectural structure photographs. Personally I always look for spaces of quiet order in my work, I like to have a tidy mind-a place for everything and everything has a place and organising the chaos into photography images with visual structure and order.

There are many compositional rules that photographers and artists employ..the rule of thirds for example, not putting the center of focus right bang in the middle, using devices to draw the eye around the image, but creative image making is more than just rules. It should be about 'how does it feel?' 'does it look right?' after all there are many exceptions to 'the rules'.

I'm not sure if composition can be taught, after all I'm sure I could compose a tune-all the right notes but just in the wrong order, and photography is the same, just putting the elements in the frame is sometimes not enough..they need to be ordered to make a hit.