Panic and planning. (adding a small detail can make a big difference)

'F8 and be there' Creating construction photography images when you have no control.

Offshore Wind Construction Photography.

Offshore Wind Construction Photography.

Sometimes you get lucky..being a professional is about getting lucky every time you pitch up at a location, and being lucky is more about thinking ahead far enough to bring together elements in a changing environment.

Offshore Wind Construction Photographers

Offshore Wind Construction Photographers

Construction progress photography-returning to the same location over a period of time to record how a project is progressing. Progress photography used to be just another line on the project tender by the client so they have a record at regular intervals, it can be so much more.

Creating image content on projects can be a great tool to engage (read-customers/stakeholders) and often show to a wider audience the activities not often considered associated with a brand. 

Returning a location regularly can present opportunities and challenges to keep creating fresh new content to show the story unfolding. Often the first 'big' lift is all about innovation, proof of concept...and the engineer's calculations were correct! then stages of progress showing the race to completion.

Planned lifts often give you a little time to 'scope' out a few good viewpoints to get clear unobstructed views whilst working around exclusion zones and other activities, but sometimes as the process is happening and the 'elements' are moving around a potential shot lines itself up.

Working out if you you have time get off site-into the project offices-up the stairs-find a 'body'-persuade them to stop what they are doing-get their PPE on and go stand on a staircase for 15 mins..then get back to the camera without missing a key part of the lift..and whether it's worth it! All I will say as an industrial photographer fitness plays an important part (note to self: STAY AWAY FROM THE DESSERTS and cycle more!!) 

''F8 and be there” is attributed to the photographer Weegee (actually Arthur Fellig) who shot iconic street images during the 1930's and 40's, progress photography is similar..it's about being there-and being there often means you get to be in the right place at the right time.

The positioning of the 'branded' observer in the shot was something I had in mind for while but was waiting for the right alignment of elements. On big projects it's nice link the people and brand with the huge structure constructions-giving them 'ownership' of the project.